Logistics

Please select your trip from the tabs below to see the logistics information for that trip. If your question is not answered in the information below, please feel free to contact us.

Icefall lodge sits at 6300 feet (1900m) and is accessed by helicopter from Golden BC. We will meet at the Heli Staging Area in Donald at 10:30 am MST (Alberta time) Sunday. There will be a helicopter safety briefing by the pilot and you will sign the waiver. We will then take a helicopter flight into the lodge.

All visitors to the lodge will be required to sign a Waiver. Those not using a guide will be required to sign a Self Guide Waiver.

Payment is by cheque in Canadian funds. You can pay by cheque in foreign funds and you will be credited the amount received at our bank. This is less than the posted rate. A deposit of 500/ person is required to book the trip. The balance is due 3 months before the start of the trip or Dec 1 for trips in March and April. If payments are not received on schedule, Icefall Lodge reserves the right to cancel your booking in which case your deposit will be forfeited.

There is satellite internet at the lodge as well as a base radio and repeater.

There is an international airport in Calgary. Golden can be reached by driving 3 hours west of Calgary. You will be responsible for your own transportation to Golden and from Golden to the staging area (20 minutes to the west). The staging area is on Donald Cemetery Rd. This is between the railway tracks and the Columbia River just west of the vehicle inspection station. Note the staging is not on Donald Rd. There is transportation available by Greyhound or a shuttle service directly from Calgary International Airport. Please do not leave valuables in the vehicles parked at the staging area.

All winter trips to Icefall are fly in, fly out one week trips.

  • Staging area: Heli Staging Area in Donald, 20 minutes west of Golden, BC on This is 20 minutes west of Golden on the Trans Canada Highway. Turn north on Donald Cemetery Rd, between the railway tracks and the Columbia River.

  • Weight limit: Because space is limited on the helicopter, we limit your personal gear to 2 small packs (Less than 40 liters each) with less than 40 pounds combined weight including beverages. Do not bring large duffle bags or packs. See the gear list below for required items.

  • Time: 15 minutes one way, 30 minutes return

  • Cost: Generally the helicopter flight is included in the package, however any extra helicopter flights due to excess baggage, late arrival or special flights mid week are the responsibility of the individual.

  • Poor weather: If we are unable to fly on the Sunday, you are responsible for your own accommodation in Golden but will not be charged extra if you are unable to fly out of the lodge. It is good to leave a day leeway with any transportation arrangements especially flights.

  • Skis with alpine touring bindings.

  • Alpine touring boots with walk and ski mode.

  • Ski poles.

  • Climbing skins, make sure they are cut to your ski.

  • Avalanche transceiver.

  • Shovel.

  • Probe.

  • Gortex Jacket and Pants.

  • Ski touring or mountaineering pants.

  • Long underwear tops and bottoms.

  • Gaitors, unless integrated into your pants.

  • Scarf or neck gaitor.

  • Fleece or wool pullover or jacket

  • Socks.

  • Camera.

  • Day Pack.

  • Water Bottle.

  • Sunglasses.

  • Sunscreen.

  • Lip Stuff.

  • Goggles.

  • Sun Hat.

  • Warm Hat.

  • Gloves.

  • Headlamp.

  • Toilet kit.

  • Towel.

  • Hut Clothes.

  • Earplugs.

  • Drinks, preferably in cans not bottles.

Make sure you have worn your boots on several tours before this trip and that they are comfortable. If you have a problem with blisters make sure that you bring moleskin or second skin and apply it before problems develop.

Self Guided and/or Self Catered Groups

In addition to the items for all trips, you will need to bring:

  • Equipment for crevasse rescue. There is a 60m half rope, and 30m half rope at the lodge that can be used.

  • First aid kit.

  • Paper towels.

  • Hand sanitizer.

  • Matches, lighter.

  • Tea towels.

  • Map of the area. This is the Rostrum Peak map, 82N14.

The lodge will be supplied with dish soap, bleach, and cleaning supplies. There are mattresses, pillows, duvets and bedding supplied. Please do not bring sleeping bags, as these are bulky and take up room in the helicopter. Pack food in cardboard boxes, do not bring coolers. Make sure that food boxes are packed efficiently. Groups often want to fly in half full food boxes. While this may be easier for organization, there simply isn’t room in the helicopter.

51.8734N -117.1314W.
1:50,000 map sheet 82 N14
Rostrum Peak 4 912E 57 470N

All cancellations must be received in writing. It is recommended that you buy cancellation insurance at the time you book the trip. You may have another skier go in your place if you can’t make the trip. We do not give refunds. You are responsible if you miss your trip for any reason, including but not limited to, missed, delayed or cancelled flights, road closures, Customs Canada, personal or business reasons. Icefall Lodge reserves the right to cancel a trip in which case you will be given a full refund.

A deposit, of half the trip price is required to book a hiking tour. The balance is due 4 weeks before the start of the trip.

All visitors to the lodge will be required to sign a Waiver. Those not using a guide will be required to sign a Self Guide Waiver.

Payment is by cheque in Canadian funds. You can pay by cheque in foreign funds and you will be credited the amount received at our bank. This is less than the posted rate.

There is satellite internet at the lodge as well as a base radio and repeater.

For groups of 10 or more, the group organizer will receive a free trip.

Helicopter transportation into and out of the lodge can be arranged. Enquire for prices.

The drive into Icefall Lodge involves 90 km of logging road. The last 18 km is rougher and can wash out with storms. Make sure to take a shovel and inflated full size spare tire.

Icefall lodge sits at 6300 feet and can be accessed in the summer either by helicopter or hiking in. The hike in is 5 km long and involves an elevation gain of 850m(2800 feet). There is a reasonable trail that travels past rushing creeks and through old growth forests before breaking into open slide paths for the last half. The hike from the trailhead to the lodge normally takes 4 to 5 hours. People find the creek crossings the most difficult, they are normally single log bridges.

If groups would like to hike in, it is recommended that they hire a guide for the day. There are several different options for hiking in and conditions can change rapidly.

This is a hut to hut traverse with some fairly big days. It will be a lot more enjoyable if you don’t have to carry a big pack. Please try to keep the packs as light as possible. There will not be a lot of standing around in the cold, we will either be hiking or at the huts if the weather is cold. Please don’t take much extra than what is on the list below.

  • Hiking Boots; these should be sturdy and water proof. We will be walking on snow a good part of the way while on the glaciers. They should also be broken in and not give you blisters. Don’t show up with a brand new pair of boots that you have never worn before.

  • Gaitors; keeps the snow out of your boots. Some pants will have a cuff that covers your boot that you can use instead.

  • Moleskin or second skin; in case you do start developing blisters

  • Pack; about 40 liters is the right size

  • Sunglasses

  • Sunscreen

  • Gloves

  • Warm hat

  • Sun hat

  • Gortex jacket

  • Climbing Pants; a soft shell or scholler type fabric works well for these. I usually find that gortex pants are too hot.

  • Fleece jacket

  • Spare socks

  • Camera.

  • Water Bottle.

  • Headlamp

  • Toothbrush

  • Earplugs

  • Sleeping bag liner; there are lightweight silk version available. The huts have blankets but I don’t have regular laundry service in the summer.

Technical Gear: This will be provided but you will need to carry it in your pack.

  • Ice Axe

  • Crampons

  • Harness

51.8734N -117.1314W.
1:50,000 map sheet 82 N14
Rostrum Peak 4 912E 57 470N

It is recommended that you buy cancellation insurance at the time you book the trip. You may have another skier go in your place if you can’t make the trip. We do not give refunds. You are responsible if you miss your trip for any reason, including but not limited to, missed, delayed or cancelled flights, road closures, Customs Canada, personal or business reasons. Icefall Lodge reserves the right to cancel a trip in which case you will be given a full refund.

The individual is responsible for the helicopter cost if they need to be flown out due to injury, medical, or any other reasons. It is suggested that you buy insurance to cover this.

If the above dates or trips do not suit your schedule, please enquire about designing a custom trip.

The mountain huts on the Haute Route offer clean dorm style rooms, hearty meals, beer and wine. When in the valley, we stay in comfortable family run hotels. At the start of the trip in Zermatt, you will be welcomed by Bruno and Catherine. Bruno is a mountain guide and has worked many years guiding with Larry. On the third night, we drop down into Arolla for another night in a hotel, and ride the lift out of the valley in the morning. This hotel night is missed by most other variations of the Haute Route. Our last night, in Cormayeur, we stay in a beautifully detailed stone building which has been in the family for three generations. The restaurant offers fine dining, with regional dishes of the Aosta Valley. A sommelier, a trained wine professional, will help you to choose from over 400 labels.

This tour requires good physical condition and advanced skiing ability. You should have previous experience back country skiing. We can and probably will be skiing in all conditions from powder to corn, wind hammered and frozen crud. There is no day that is particularly hard, but doing it day after day for a week takes its toll. Good skiing ability will help you save energy on the descent. Mountaineering skills are not a prerequisite and will be taught as needed on the tour. You must be able to do a kick turn on steep icy slopes and side slip on 40 degree slopes.

Ski touring in the Alps offers the unique advantage of being able to ski with light packs and arrive at a well-provisioned hut for the night. While food and blankets are provided at the huts we are still in the high mountains and must bring clothing to deal with any weather conditions. We can be baking in the hot sun or on a windy ridge in a blizzard. Many days in the spring start with cold mornings and icy snow, then turn hot as the day progresses especially when we ski down to a low valley.

One of the keys to enjoy ski touring in the Alps is to make sure that your pack is light, preferably under 20 pounds. While the weather may be severe, we are seldom standing still in cold weather and the huts are warm. Try to minimize the amount of extra gear that you bring. Each day we will be moving from hut to hut with all of our gear on our back. It is not only safer to have a light pack, but much more enjoyable.

There is a luggage room at our hotel in Zermatt, where you can leave extra gear or luggage for the rest of your trip. This luggage will meet us at the end of our trip in Chamonix. There will be two other stops in towns along the way to top up on lunch food.

Technical Gear:

  • Skis with alpine touring bindings.

  • Alpine touring boots with walk and ski mode, they must be able to fit crampons. Make sure you have worn your boots on several tours before this trip and that they are comfortable. If you have a problem with blisters make sure that you bring moleskin or second skin and apply it before problems develop.

  • Adjustable ski poles.

  • Climbing skins, make sure they are cut to your ski.

  • Avalanche transceiver (457 KHz), these can be provided, just be sure to let me know before the trip.

  • Shovel.

  • Probe.

  • Backpack, medium size about 35 litres.

  • Ski crampons.

  • Harness, lightweight without padding is best.

  • Locking carabiner.

Note: People often ask whether they can do the trip with telemark gear. While it is possible for a very strong skier to do the trip on telemark gear, it is not recommended. The sometimes difficult snow conditions, deep heavy snow or windcrust, make it much more difficult without the heel locked down. It can be done if you are a strong skier but it takes a lot more energy, especially with your pack. Another difficulty is finding ski crampons to work with a telemark system. Ski crampons are necessary on steep icy slopes especially in the morning when the snow is still frozen hard. Manufacturers do not make ski crampons for telemark systems. The ski crampons for telemark that I have seen are adapted from alpine touring systems. One possibility is using a Dynafit binding plate on your ski, which will fit Dynafit ski crampons. I have yet to see a telemark ski crampon that works as well or is as easy to change over as an alpine touring system.

Personal Gear:

  • Sunglasses.

  • Sun hat.

  • Warm ski hat.

  • Water bottle or thermos, minimum 1 liter. The huts will sell bottled water or tea for your thermos.

  • Goggles.

  • Sunscreen and lip protection.

  • Ski gloves.

  • Scarf or neck gaitor.

  • Long underwear tops, this should be synthetic and lightweight for the hot days.

  • Lightweight fleece jacket.

  • Medium weight fleece jacket.

  • Cotton t-shirt, luxury item for wearing around the hut. Many huts also sell these.

  • Windproof jacket, lightweight is best, it does not have to be Gortex, but should be breathable and water resistant.

  • Windproof pants, for when the weather turns foul. Again they should be lightweight, breathable, and you should be able to get them on over your ski boots.

  • Ski pants, something that is not cotton, offers protection from wind and snow but is not too hot when the sun shines. Patagonia, Mammut and Schoffel all have excellent pants.

  • Gaiters, unless integrated into your pants.

  • Socks, 2 pairs.

  • Earplugs, the huts can be noisy.

  • Lightweight cotton or silk sleeping bag liner for sanitary reasons, wool blankets are provided at the huts.

  • Headlamp, small lightweight such as the Petzl Tika.

  • Camera.

  • Personal items toothbrush, toothpaste, medication, contact lenses etc. Try to keep it to a minimum, for instance buy a smaller tube of toothpaste or share with a friend. There are no showers or running water at the huts.

  • Money (mostly Swiss Francs and some Euros), for buying drinks, snacks or lunches while on the tour.

  • Snacks, chocolate and sandwiches can be purchased in the huts.

  • Lunch food, this is less expensive if purchased in town but you can also get it at the huts.

  • Very lightweight shoes or slippers for town. Hut shoes are provided at the huts, I usually use my inner boots to walk around town.

This tour requires good physical condition and advanced skiing ability. You should have previous experience back country skiing. We can and probably will be skiing in all conditions from powder to corn, wind hammered and frozen crud. There is no day that is particularly hard, but doing it day after day for a week takes its toll. Good skiing ability will help you save energy on the descent. Mountaineering skills are not a prerequisite and will be taught as needed on the tour. You must be able to do a kick turn on steep icy slopes and side slip on 40 degree slopes. No previous experience with crampons or ice axe necessary.

Ski touring in the Alps offers the unique advantage of being able to ski with light packs and arrive at a well-provisioned hut for the night. While food and blankets are provided at the huts we are still in the high mountains and must bring clothing to deal with any weather conditions. We can be baking in the hot sun or on a windy ridge in a blizzard. Many days in the spring start with cold mornings and icy snow, then turn hot as the day progresses especially when we ski down to a low valley.

One of the keys to enjoy ski touring in the Alps is to make sure that your pack is light, preferably under 20 pounds. While the weather may be severe, we are seldom standing still in cold weather and the huts are warm. Try to minimize the amount of extra gear that you bring. Each day we will be moving from hut to hut with all of our gear on our back. It is not only safer to have a light pack, but much more enjoyable.

There will be a luggage room at the start of the trip in Grindelwald. You can leave anything that you won’t be using on the trip there. I don’t recommend that you leave anything too valuable there. At the end of the trip we will be in a different valley and have to take a train back around to Grindelwald. I normally wear my ski boots or inner boots for this trip. Slippers are provided at all the huts. It is also possible to have gear shipped on the train to our end point.

Technical Gear:

  • Skis with alpine touring bindings.

  • Alpine touring boots with walk and ski mode, they must be able to fit crampons. Make sure you have worn your boots on several tours before this trip and that they are comfortable. If you have a problem with blisters make sure that you bring moleskin or second skin and apply it before problems develop.

  • Adjustable ski poles.

  • Climbing skins, make sure they are cut to your ski.

  • Avalanche transceiver (457 KHz), these can be provided, just be sure to let me know before the trip.

  • Shovel.

  • Probe.

  • Backpack, medium size about 35 litres.

  • Ski crampons.

  • Harness, lightweight without padding is best.

  • Locking carabiner.

Note: People often ask whether they can do the trip with telemark gear. While it is possible for a very strong skier to do the trip on telemark gear, it is not recommended. The sometimes difficult snow conditions, deep heavy snow or windcrust, make it much more difficult without the heel locked down. It can be done if you are a strong skier but it takes a lot more energy, especially with your pack. Another difficulty is finding ski crampons to work with a telemark system. Ski crampons are necessary on steep icy slopes especially in the morning when the snow is still frozen hard. Manufacturers do not make ski crampons for telemark systems. The ski crampons for telemark that I have seen are adapted from alpine touring systems. One possibility is using a Dynafit binding plate on your ski, which will fit Dynafit ski crampons. I have yet to see a telemark ski crampon that works as well or is as easy to change over as an alpine touring system.

Personal Gear:

  • Sunglasses.

  • Sun hat.

  • Warm ski hat.

  • Water bottle or thermos, minimum 1 liter. The huts will sell bottled water or tea for your thermos.

  • Goggles.

  • Sunscreen and lip protection.

  • Ski gloves.

  • Scarf or neck gaitor.

  • Long underwear tops, this should be synthetic and lightweight for the hot days.

  • Lightweight fleece jacket.

  • Medium weight fleece jacket.

  • Cotton t-shirt, luxury item for wearing around the hut. Many huts also sell these.

  • Windproof jacket, lightweight is best, it does not have to be Gortex, but should be breathable and water resistant.

  • Windproof pants, for when the weather turns foul. Again they should be lightweight, breathable, and you should be able to get them on over your ski boots.

  • Ski pants, something that is not cotton, offers protection from wind and snow but is not too hot when the sun shines. Patagonia, Mammut and Schoffel all have excellent pants.

  • Gaiters, unless integrated into your pants.

  • Socks, 2 pairs.

  • Earplugs, the huts can be noisy.

  • Lightweight cotton or silk sleeping bag liner for sanitary reasons, wool blankets are provided at the huts.

  • Headlamp, small lightweight such as the Petzl Tika.

  • Camera.

  • Personal items toothbrush, toothpaste, medication, contact lenses etc. Try to keep it to a minimum, for instance buy a smaller tube of toothpaste or share with a friend. There are no showers or running water at the huts.

  • Money (Swiss Francs), for buying drinks, snacks or lunches while on the tour.

  • Snacks, chocolate and sandwiches can be purchased in the huts.

  • Lunch food, this is less expensive if purchased in town but you can also get it at the huts.

The mountain huts on the Haute Route offer clean dorm style rooms, hearty meals, beer and wine. When in the valley, we stay in comfortable family run hotels. At the start of the trip in Zermatt, you will be welcomed by Bruno and Catherine. Bruno is a mountain guide and has worked many years guiding with Larry. On the third night, we drop down into Arolla for another night in a hotel, and ride the lift out of the valley in the morning. This hotel night is missed by most other variations of the Haute Route. Our last night, in Cormayeur, we stay in a beautifully detailed stone building which has been in the family for three generations. The restaurant offers fine dining, with regional dishes of the Aosta Valley. A sommelier, a trained wine professional, will help you to choose from over 400 labels.

This tour requires good physical condition and advanced skiing ability. You should have previous experience back country skiing. We can and probably will be skiing in all conditions from powder to corn, wind hammered and frozen crud. There is no day that is particularly hard, but doing it day after day for a week takes its toll. Good skiing ability will help you save energy on the descent. Mountaineering skills are not a prerequisite and will be taught as needed on the tour. You must be able to do a kick turn on steep icy slopes and side slip on 40 degree slopes.

Although some of the strategically located huts started as military bases, they are anything but Spartan. The Ortler traverse is sometimes known as the Cappuccino traverse, the Italians know how to live well. Good food, good drink and comfortable rooms are the trademark of this tour. Many nights we will sleep two people to a room, sometimes even with your own washroom. All huts have showers.

This tour requires good physical condition and advanced skiing ability. You should have previous experience back country skiing. We can and probably will be skiing in all conditions from powder to corn, wind hammered and frozen crud. There is no day that is particularly hard, but doing it day after day for a week takes its toll. Good skiing ability will help you save energy on the descent. Mountaineering skills are not a prerequisite and will be taught as needed on the tour. You must be able to do a kick turn on steep icy slopes and side slip on 40 degree slopes.

Ski touring in the Alps offers the unique advantage of being able to ski with light packs and arrive at a well-provisioned hut for the night. While food and blankets are provided at the huts we are still in the high mountains and must bring clothing to deal with any weather conditions. We can be baking in the hot sun or on a windy ridge in a blizzard. Many days in the spring start with cold mornings and icy snow, then turn hot as the day progresses especially when we ski down to a low valley.

One of the keys to enjoy ski touring in the Alps is to make sure that your pack is light, preferably under 20 pounds. While the weather may be severe, we are seldom standing still in cold weather and the huts are warm. Try to minimize the amount of extra gear that you bring. Each day we will be moving from hut to hut with all of our gear on our back. It is not only safer to have a light pack, but much more enjoyable.

The Ortler trip has huts that are much nicer than others in the Alps. The huts all have showers and there are less people to a room. You can drive or take a taxi to our first hut. There is a room where you can leave luggage that you will not be taking on the tour however I would not recommend leaving valuables.

The ski between huts is relatively short on this tour (2-3 hours), so weight is not as much of an issue, but it is still best to have light packs

Technical Gear:

  • Skis with alpine touring bindings.

  • Alpine touring boots with walk and ski mode, they must be able to fit crampons. Make sure you have worn your boots on several tours before this trip and that they are comfortable. If you have a problem with blisters make sure that you bring moleskin or second skin and apply it before problems develop.

  • Adjustable ski poles.

  • Climbing skins, make sure they are cut to your ski.

  • Avalanche transceiver (457 KHz), these can be provided, just be sure to let me know before the trip.

  • Shovel.

  • Probe.

  • Backpack, medium size about 35 litres.

  • Ski crampons.

  • Harness, lightweight without padding is best.

  • Locking carabiner.

Note: People often ask whether they can do the trip with telemark gear. While it is possible for a very strong skier to do the trip on telemark gear, it is not recommended. The sometimes difficult snow conditions, deep heavy snow or windcrust, make it much more difficult without the heel locked down. It can be done if you are a strong skier but it takes a lot more energy, especially with your pack. Another difficulty is finding ski crampons to work with a telemark system. Ski crampons are necessary on steep icy slopes especially in the morning when the snow is still frozen hard. Manufacturers do not make ski crampons for telemark systems. The ski crampons for telemark that I have seen are adapted from alpine touring systems. One possibility is using a Dynafit binding plate on your ski, which will fit Dynafit ski crampons. I have yet to see a telemark ski crampon that works as well or is as easy to change over as an alpine touring system.

Personal Gear:

  • Sunglasses.

  • Sun hat.

  • Warm ski hat.

  • Water bottle or thermos, minimum 1 liter. The huts will sell bottled water or tea for your thermos.

  • Goggles.

  • Sunscreen and lip protection.

  • Ski gloves.

  • Scarf or neck gaitor.

  • Long underwear tops, this should be synthetic and lightweight for the hot days.

  • Lightweight fleece jacket.

  • Medium weight fleece jacket.

  • Cotton t-shirt, luxury item for wearing around the hut. Many huts also sell these.

  • Windproof jacket, lightweight is best, it does not have to be Gortex, but should be breathable and water resistant.

  • Windproof pants, for when the weather turns foul. Again they should be lightweight, breathable, and you should be able to get them on over your ski boots.

  • Ski pants, something that is not cotton, offers protection from wind and snow but is not too hot when the sun shines. Patagonia, Mammut and Schoffel all have excellent pants.

  • Gaiters, unless integrated into your pants.

  • Socks, 2 pairs.

  • Earplugs, the huts can be noisy.

  • Lightweight cotton or silk sleeping bag liner for sanitary reasons, wool blankets are provided at the huts.

  • Headlamp, small lightweight such as the Petzl Tika.

  • Camera.

  • Personal items toothbrush, toothpaste, medication, contact lenses etc. Try to keep it to a minimum, for instance buy a smaller tube of toothpaste or share with a friend. There are no showers or running water at the huts.

  • Money (Euros), for buying drinks, snacks or lunches while on the tour.

  • Snacks, chocolate and sandwiches can be purchased in the huts.

  • Lunch food, this is less expensive if purchased in town but you can also get it at the huts.

Patagonia’s unique landscapes offers endless skiable terrain with charming mountain huts. This incredible 8 days backcountry touring trip includes 5 nights in a cozy and rustic mountain huts like Frey and Jacob where you can enjoy an amazing alpine terrain. At the end of a beautiful day of backcountry skiing, Frey hut offers excellent Malbec wines, beer on tap from local microbreweries, homemade pasta, pizza, and fondue.

This tour requires good physical condition and advanced skiing ability. You should have previous experience back country skiing. We can and probably will be skiing in all conditions from powder to corn, wind hammered and frozen crud. There is no day that is particularly hard, but doing it day after day for a week takes its toll. Good skiing ability will help you save energy on the descent. Mountaineering skills are not a prerequisite and will be taught as needed on the tour. You must be able to do a kick turn on steep icy slopes and side slip on 40 degree slopes.

Discover winter in the Southern Hemisphere! A backcountry ski touring trip to experience the wild peaks, couloirs and valleys of the Lake District in Bariloche. The huts are all above treeline, so we will have some incredible alpine terrain to play in. Refugio Frey is well known as one of the best ski huts in Argentina! The setting is magical: a cirque of golden granite spires and the couloirs in between the towers come down to merge in a frozen lake. Frey hut sits beside the lake of Nahuel Huapi National Park. Possibilities are endless! Determined by skiers’ preference and the weather conditions, your guide will show you the best lines. If weather does not cooperate or there is low visibility, there is tree skiing as well. At the end of a beautiful day of backcountry skiing, Frey hut offers excellent Malbec wines, beer on tap from local microbreweries, homemade pasta, pizza, and fondue.

One of the keys to enjoy ski touring is to make sure that your pack is light, preferably under 20 pounds. While the weather may be severe, we are seldom standing still in cold weather and the huts are warm. Try to minimize the amount of extra gear that you bring.

Technical Gear:

  • Skis with alpine touring bindings.

  • Alpine touring boots with walk and ski mode, they must be able to fit crampons. Make sure you have worn your boots on several tours before this trip and that they are comfortable. If you have a problem with blisters make sure that you bring moleskin or second skin and apply it before problems develop.

  • Adjustable ski poles.

  • Climbing skins, make sure they are cut to your ski.

  • Avalanche transceiver (457 KHz), these can be provided, just be sure to let me know before the trip.

  • Shovel.

  • Probe.

  • Backpack, medium size about 35 litres.

  • Ski crampons.

  • Harness, lightweight without padding is best.

  • Locking carabiner.

Note: People often ask whether they can do the trip with telemark gear. While it is possible for a very strong skier to do the trip on telemark gear, it is not recommended. The sometimes difficult snow conditions, deep heavy snow or windcrust, make it much more difficult without the heel locked down. It can be done if you are a strong skier but it takes a lot more energy, especially with your pack. Another difficulty is finding ski crampons to work with a telemark system. Ski crampons are necessary on steep icy slopes especially in the morning when the snow is still frozen hard. Manufacturers do not make ski crampons for telemark systems. The ski crampons for telemark that I have seen are adapted from alpine touring systems. One possibility is using a Dynafit binding plate on your ski, which will fit Dynafit ski crampons. I have yet to see a telemark ski crampon that works as well or is as easy to change over as an alpine touring system.

Personal Gear:

  • Sunglasses.

  • Sun hat.

  • Warm ski hat.

  • Water bottle or thermos, minimum 1 liter. The huts will sell bottled water or tea for your thermos.

  • Goggles.

  • Sunscreen and lip protection.

  • Ski gloves.

  • Scarf or neck gaitor.

  • Long underwear tops, this should be synthetic and lightweight for the hot days.

  • Lightweight fleece jacket.

  • Medium weight fleece jacket.

  • Cotton t-shirt, luxury item for wearing around the hut. Many huts also sell these.

  • Windproof jacket, lightweight is best, it does not have to be Gortex, but should be breathable and water resistant.

  • Windproof pants, for when the weather turns foul. Again they should be lightweight, breathable, and you should be able to get them on over your ski boots.

  • Ski pants, something that is not cotton, offers protection from wind and snow but is not too hot when the sun shines. Patagonia, Mammut and Schoffel all have excellent pants.

  • Gaiters, unless integrated into your pants.

  • Socks, 2 pairs.

  • Earplugs, the huts can be noisy.

  • Lightweight cotton or silk sleeping bag liner for sanitary reasons, wool blankets are provided at the huts.

  • Headlamp, small lightweight such as the Petzl Tika.

  • Camera.

  • Personal items toothbrush, toothpaste, medication, contact lenses etc. Try to keep it to a minimum, for instance buy a smaller tube of toothpaste or share with a friend. There are no showers or running water at the huts.

  • Money, for buying drinks, snacks or lunches while on the tour.

  • Snacks, chocolate and sandwiches can be purchased in the huts.

Are you ready for adventure?

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